Relief Teaching Ideas

Sharing ideas to help make relief teaching fun, enjoyable, and meaningful.


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Rainbow Squiggle Line Drawing

By Emma Hessel

When I saw this idea on Relief Teaching Ideas, I just had to try it in the art room! The beauty of this activity is that it’s adaptable to most year levels. I’ve delivered this lesson to students between year 1 and 6 with success. The younger years may not be able to achieve quite the same impact as years 5 or 6, but they sure give it a red hot go!
I start this lesson by telling the children we will be doing a line drawing, and show them my own drawing I had prepared earlier. Their faces light up as they take in the psychedelic colours and patterns produced by a simple squiggle!

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Students only need an A4 piece of paper and a marker to draw their squiggle, followed by twistable crayons or pencils for the colouring.

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I demonstrate the technique on the board, drawing a squiggle with lots of “loop the loops” and intersecting lines. I explain that they need to make sure most of the page is covered by the squiggle, and they can add in extra squiggly lines to break up any large white spaces. This will make it easier to colour in the individual sections. On the other hand they don’t want TOO many squiggles, as they will need areas large enough to fill with several colours.

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I demonstrate the colouring techniques for students on the board. First I show them how to colour from the outside of a section, working inwards, using rainbow colours. I suggest they colour in a strip of about 1cm width, colouring in a perpendicular angle to the line of marker (not parallel). This helps achieve the blended look between the colours.

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Another technique they can use is to colour in rainbow stripes across more narrow sections, where colouring around the edges would otherwise result in a monotonous section of just one or two colours.

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I remind them to choose different colours to start colouring the edges of each section, to give the finished artwork more contrast. This will also give them sections filled with different groups of colours, which looks great when it’s finished.
This lesson has been a real winner, and I love seeing the diverse range of creations the students come up with!

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This guest post was written by Emma Hessel. Emma has been a wonderful supporter of our page. She regularly contributes ideas & inspirational photos on our Facebook group. I was excited when she agreed to write about one of her successful art lessons.
A big thank you to Emma for sharing this project with all of us!

Denise

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Friendly Fish or Piranha?!

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Yesterday I was working in an Art Room & I got one of the classes to make some ‘Fish or Piranha’ pictures – so much fun!

I originally saw this idea on Pinterest. Here is the original link:
http://plastiquem.blogspot.com.au/2012/02/peix-o-piranya.html?m=1

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I really loved this clever art project & wanted to try it but when I clicked on the link the instructions weren’t in English. By looking at the pictures & playing around with some paper, I think I worked out the fold correctly. 🙂

1. Start off with a piece of drawing paper. I used an A4 sized piece but if you had more time, students could make A3 sized pictures.

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2. Lift up the bottom edge & fold the paper on half.

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3. Fold down the top flap.

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4. Draw the fish in pencil. Draw in a small smile, close to & touching the fold line. Add spots, scales or lines to decorate. It’s very important to draw all the fish detail in first so that when it’s folded down all the lines join up!

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5. Open up & finish piranha – connect lines, draw mouth & teeth (first bottom tooth starts from the smile line).

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6. Go over with black marker.

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7. Add colour with pencils, crayons or water colours. I used crayons for this example.

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Hope you enjoy this art project as much as I did!


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14 Different Hand Print Animals

There are so many cute ideas for handprint crafts out there but i really love how different these ones are to the normal ones you see!!

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Show the kids these examples & see if they can either replicate or come up with their own designs.

If you have an old style projector in your room you could also have some fun with shadow hand puppets. Can they guess each others animals?

http://krokotak.com/2013/04/14-ways-to-make-handprint-animals/


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Line Art

line art
– Looks complicated but is actually pretty easy!

Filling in for an Art Specialist with no set work for the day? Have an afternoon to fill? This is a great activity to teach students about lines, colour matching & shading.

All you need is A4 paper, black textas & coloured pencils. If you want it to be a smaller project use A5 sized paper & have students draw only 6 dots on their wavy line.

The photo shows examples that I drew up. I keep them in my Relief Folder – just in case!

I love the easy, step by step instructions that can be found in the link below. If I can do it, anyone can!

http://artwithmre.blogspot.com.au/2011/12/line-design-explained-deluxe-edition.html?m=1