Relief Teaching Ideas

Sharing ideas to help make relief teaching fun, enjoyable, and meaningful.


Leave a comment

Roll a 6!

Did you ever play the Chocolate Game? It was a very popular birthday party game when I was at primary school. You would take turns rolling a die. If you rolled a 6 you would dress up in a silly costume & then use a knife & fork to cut & eat from a block of chocolate. It was a noisy, fast paced game, and we all loved it!

This is NOT that game but reminds me a little of it.

20140624-134806-49686911.jpg
Roll a 6!

Equipment

Each group will need:
– 1 piece of paper
– 1 die
– 1 pencil

How to Play

– Divide class into groups of 4 or 5
– Hand out equipment needed
– Students sit in a circle
– Students take turns rolling the die
– If they roll a 6 they start writing the numbers 1 – 100 on the piece of paper.
– When someone else rolls a 6 they take over the writing of the number, from wherever the previous person finished.
For example: Student A writes 1 – 12, Student B rolls a 6 so takes over & starts writing 13, 14, 15, etc…until the next person rolls a 6, and so on & on.
– The winner is the student who writes the number 100!

Variations

– Instead of rolling a 6, students need to roll a 1 (or any other number you choose)
– Have students write/count by 2s or 5s, instead of 1s
– Have students roll 2 dice. The dice have to add up to 10 for them to start writing (or any other +, – or x that you would like!)

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Shower Curtain Game Board

20130712-144309.jpg
I love using plastic curtains or tablecloths in the classroom because they are so easy to set up, move around & store! I’ve used them for bulletin boards, to section off areas like a reading corner, to cover tables for messy work & also to make giant game boards.

Game boards can be easily folded up & stored away in your relief teaching bag!

20130712-144333.jpg
To make the game board:
– Buy a cheap, light coloured shower curtain. This one was only $5 from The Reject Shop.
– Draw a 7×4 grid with a thick black marker. I just followed the fold lines, I didn’t use a ruler.
– Cut clear, plastic sleeve protectors in half.
– Tape the plastic sleeves in each rectangle.
– Cut A4 sized paper in half & write your review questions, math problems or sight words on the bits of paper.
– Place them in the plastic sleeves.

20130712-144437.jpg
To play:
GAME ONE
– Have a container of counters by the game mat.
– Students take turns throwing or rolling a counter onto the grid.
– Whichever square it lands on they need to answer the question (if it’s a sight word they need to read it or put it into a sentence).
– If they get it correct they get to keep the counter. If they get it wrong the counter stays in that square.
– If a player gets a question correct they get to keep their counter plus any other counters that have been left in that square.
– Students count up how many counters they have at the end of the game. Whoever has the most counters wins!

20130712-144531.jpg
GAME TWO
– Colour code the cards (these can be in rows or all mixed up.)
Green = easy question = 1 point
Yellow = medium question = 2 points
Red = hard question = 3 points

– Divide class either in half or into 3 groups. Have the groups line up in front of the grid.
– Students take turns throwing a beanbag onto the grid. They answer the question & if they get it correct they get the corresponding amount of points for their team. Keep a tally on the whiteboard. If they don’t get the question correct they don’t get any points.
-Once everyone has gone through two or three times, tally up the points. The team with the highest score wins!

20130712-144622.jpg

These are so versatile! I’ve only listed two ideas but you could do so much more. It’s up to you how you want to play & what skills you want your students to practice.