Fractured Colouring In Art Work

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Here is a simple art idea, focusing on shape and colour choice. Print off some simple drawings for students to choose from. I find that animal outlines work the best but you could also use pictures of transport, fruit, people, maps of countries (map of Australia turns out well), or other simple outlines. Have students use a ruler to draw lines across the picture. The more lines, the smaller the sections will be. 15-20 lines are usually good for an A4 sized picture. Discuss colour choice with students. What colour combinations complement each other? Which colours contrast? Discuss warm and cool colours. For my example I have chosen warm colours for inside the picture and cool colours for around it. After students have coloured each section you can mount it on black or white card to frame it.

Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert

What a delightful, whimsical book! The Leaf Man by Lois Ehlert* uses the shapes and colours of different leaves as inspiration for its illustrations. The story explores where the mythical 'Leaf Man' goes whenever the wind blows. This gorgeous book was brought to my attention when I posted these photos of leaf creatures on my Facebook page. Pictures & craft ideas found here: http://atelierpourenfants.blogspot.com.au/2010/06/des-feuilles-tres-tres-chouettes.html?m=1 and here: http://spoonful.com/crafts/foliage-friends One of our members mentioned that they had read The Leaf Man to their class and then used it as inspiration to create similar pictures. I ordered the book soon after! I think it would make a lovely afternoon of reading, collecting leaves and then creating leaf creatures.. Students could also use their pictures as a writing prompt for a story or poem. I will post photos of some leaf creatures that I have made soon!   *This post contains an affiliate link,

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Rainbow Squiggle Line Drawing

By Emma Hessel When I saw this idea on Relief Teaching Ideas, I just had to try it in the art room! The beauty of this activity is that it’s adaptable to most year levels. I’ve delivered this lesson to students between year 1 and 6 with success. The younger years may not be able to achieve quite the same impact as years 5 or 6, but they sure give it a red hot go! I start this lesson by telling the children we will be doing a line drawing, and show them my own drawing I had prepared earlier. Their faces light up as they take in the psychedelic colours and patterns produced by a simple squiggle! Students only need an A4 piece of paper and a marker to draw their squiggle, followed by twistable crayons or pencils for the colouring. I demonstrate the technique on the board, drawing

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